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Meteorology
The Ionious Solar System¡¯s sun, Hestia, is classified as a G0 star with temperatures measuring 6030 degrees Kelvin. The Earth¡¯s sun is classified as a G2 star and measures at 5860 degrees Kelvin. Although Hestia is warmer than the sun, temperatures on Planet Vesta are very similar to that of Earth because it is located 1.34 AU from Hestia. This places Planet Vesta farther from Hestia than Earth from the sun. Planet Vesta has five major climate zones: tropical, tepid, temperate, glacial, and polar. Planet Vesta is made up of approximately 80% water and 20% land.
 
Surface/Ocean Currents
Surface currents near the central girth of Planet Vesta normally flow from east to west, but surface currents closer to the poles tend to flow from west to east. The directional flow of the surface currents is due to Planet Vesta¡¯s global winds, the rotation of the planet, and the deflection of currents when they meet the continents. Surface currents are also affected by the temperature of the water. Warm-water currents begin near the central girth and carry warm water towards the poles to other parts of the ocean. Cold-water currents begin closer to the poles and carry cool water towards the central girth and other parts of the ocean. Tides, rain, runoff, and ocean bottom activities also affect the surface currents of Planet Vesta. Please click on the map at right for an illustration of Planet Vesta¡¯s surface/ocean currents.
 
Atmospheric Pressure and Wind
Solar energy, along with the rotation of the planet, influences the atmospheric pressure and wind currents on Planet Vesta. Planet Vesta receives more direct solar energy from Hestia at the central girth than at the poles. The solar energy causes the air to be warmer and less-dense at the central girth than the air at the poles. Warm and less-dense air at the central girth rises and creates an area of low pressure. The air at the poles is colder, more dense, and heavier. The sinking air creates areas of high pressure. The differences in atmospheric pressure at the central girth and at the poles cause air to flow. The air moves from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure, which means winds normally flow from the poles to the central girth. The rotation of the planet causes the winds north of the central girth to curve to the right. These winds move from the northeast to the southwest. Wind south of the central girth curve to the left and flow from the southeast to the northwest. Please click on the map at left for an illustration of Planet Vesta¡¯s atmospheric pressure and wind.
 

Climate Zones
As discussed earlier, although Ionious solar system¡¯s sun Hestia, is a warmer star than the Earth¡¯s sun, temperatures on Planet Vesta are very similar to that of Earth because it is located 1.34 AU from Hestia. This places Planet Vesta farther from Hestia than Earth from the sun. Planet Vesta has five major climate zones: tropical, tepid, temperate, glacial, and polar. Each zone has a temperature range that relates to its latitudinal location and its exposure to the sun. However, in each of these zones there are several types of climates due to differences in geography and the amount of precipitation. Please click on the map and table at right for average temperatures on Planet Vesta.
 

Rainfall
The formation of rain on Planet Vesta is similar to that on Earth. Rain is water in liquid form that falls from the clouds to Vesta. Solid forms of rain, also known as snow on Earth, also exist on Vesta. Topography affects the amounts of precipitation different regions receive. Land of higher elevation normally experiences more precipitation than land of lower elevation. Therefore, the average yearly precipitation on Planet Vesta varies greatly within each climate zone. Please click on the map and table below for average yearly precipitation on Planet Vesta.

 
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